Sunday, February 7, 2016

Sri Lanka The Cheapest Country To Own a Mobile Phone

Sri Lanka boasts a Mobile penetration of 107% Which makes a always on Mobile strategy a must for local Brands.There is no other devise you use or have at arms reach than a mobile device on a given day. Its said that a average smart phone user looks at his mobile every 5 minutes,that a overall 200 times a day.

With the recently published "Measuring the Information Society Report - PDF Link" by ITU which is the UN's specialized agency for global ICT statistics, Sri Lanka ranks as the cheapest country to own a mobile.

The Cheapest and Priciest Places for Mobile

Monthly phone usage cost in 2014 U.S. dollars (not including device)

Cheapest

Sri Lanka Cheapest Mobile Rates in The World
Cheapest Mobile Rates in The World


Priciest


Priciest Mobile Rates in The World
Priciest Mobile Rates in The World







Thursday, January 7, 2016

Time to Netflix and Chill in Sri Lanka

Netflix Sri lanka
Netflix
As you may know by now, “Netflix” the global Internet TV network giant launched its services in SL, simultaneously bringing its Internet TV network to more than 130 new countries around the world. The company made the announcement and the service went live today. 


For one monthly price, members around the world will be able to enjoy Netflix original series. Packages range from a HD being Rs.1400 and a Ultra HD being Rs.1700 and the first month being FREE. 

With Mobile penetration being over 104% this is going to be a game changer in SL. Netflix is available on virtually any device that has an Internet connection, including personal computers, tablets, smartphones, Smart TVs and game consoles, and automatically provides the best possible streaming quality based on available bandwidth. Many titles, including Netflix original series and films, are available in high-definition with Dolby Digital Plus 5.1 surround sound and some in Ultra HD 4K. As for data usage, Netflix states that an SD stream would use up anywhere between 300MB and 700MB an hour, while an HD stream would utilize up to 3GB an hour.



Registering for any tier of Netflix is as straightforward as it gets: Just enter your email address, select a password, pick a plan, and add your card details. 


Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Tweets from the Cricketing World on Sangas Retirement

Kumar Sangakkara retires
Kumar Sangakkara retires

Sri Lanka's Kumar Sangakkara said a tearful farewell to international cricket on Monday and immediately well wishes came bucketing from the cricketing world. Here are some of the tweets and compliments to the legend.


Angelo Mathews
Angelo Mathews

Anil Kumble
Anil Kumble

Dimuth Karunaratne
Dimuth Karunaratne

Farveez Maharoof
Farveez Maharoof

Harsha Bhogle
Harsha Bhogle

Mahela Jayawardene
Mahela Jayawardene

Michael Clarke
Michael Clarke

Rohit Sharma
Rohit Sharma

Sachin Tendulkar
Sachin Tendulkar

Sanath Jayasuriya
Sanath Jayasuriya

Sanjay Manjrekar
Sanjay Manjrekar

Stephen Fleming
Stephen Fleming

The Board Of Control For Cricket In India
The Board Of Control For Cricket In India

Tom Moody
Tom Moody

VVS Laxman
VVS Laxman

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

What is the Ice Bucket Challenge

Bill Gates ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
Bill Gates ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

You can't go an hour without seeing an online video one of your friends, a major celebrity or a tech titan dump a bucket of ice water on their heads posted on social networking sites. If you’ve spent any time on social media lately, you are probably familiar with the “ALS Ice Bucket Challenge,” which over the last few weeks has spread like wildfire through news feeds across the country. The parameters of the Challenge are thus: If elected to participate by one of your peers, you must either pour a bucket of ice water over your head, or make a donation to the ALS Association, or both. You have 24 hours to do so. Video of the ritual is then published on Facebook for any and all to see. Mark Zuckerberg has accepted the challenge. Jimmy Fallon has too. Conan O’Brien answered the call. But according to new Facebook data, the ice bucket challenge quietly started as far back as June 8, nearly six weeks before it was tied to ALS in July and eventually reached viral status this week.

For those unfamiliar with the trend, the concept is easy: Grab a bucket of ice water, pour it over your head and have someone film the whole thing. Post the clip to Facebook or Twitter and then challenge a few people (even celebrities) to do the same within 24 hours, or make a $100 donation to charity. Of course, the idea is to do both. It's become this summer's version of the "Harlem Shake" or "Call Me Maybe" video parodies, but for a good cause.

While "Today" show anchor Matt Lauer was one of the first to bring the ice bucket challenge to the mainstream on July 15 during a live broadcast, it wasn't until golfer Chris Kennedy participated too and challenged his cousin Jeanette Senerchia of Pelham, New York to film her own video — her husband is battling is ALS.

Mark Zuckerberg Accepts Ice Bucket Challenge
Mark Zuckerberg Accepts Ice Bucket Challenge

The ingenious social media campaign was designed to garner both awareness and support for the fight against amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. ALS, more commonly referred to as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease,” is a neurodegenerative illness affecting the nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. The disease causes the progressive breakdown of motor neurons, which over time leads to a loss of control over the body’s muscles, and eventually paralysis and death. It goes without saying that this currently cureless disease is worthy of both funds and awareness. Between July 29 and Aug. 12, the ALS Association and its 38 chapters raised a total of $4 million, or nearly $3 million more than during the same period last year. The campaign has already, Facebook told Time magazine this week, resulted in 1.2 million unique videos.
Of course, the Challenge has also drawn its fair share of criticism. Jacob Davidson (whose father died of ALS) explains his trouble reconciling the nature of the Challenge with the admittedly impressive sum of money it has raised. “’Want to help fight this disease? No? Well, then you better dump some cold water on your head’” Davidson writes, paraphrasing what he views as the perverse incentive structure built into the campaign. “The challenge even seems to be suggesting that being cold, wet, and uncomfortable is preferable to fighting ALS.” And William McAskill, a research fellow in moral philosophy at Emmanuel College, explains in a Quartz article his concern that the Challenge could cannibalize donations to other causes.

More than 15 million people have joined in on the conversation about the ice bucket challenge on Facebook, including posting, commenting or Liking a challenge post. Facebook—and many other social companies—periodically release data about its users en masse to highlight interesting trends and to receive positive press coverage. In February, Facebook shared what it sees when its users fall in love; last fall, Foursquare showed how the habits of its users changed in D.C. as the government shutdown dragged on. These big data dumps should also be a reminder that Facebook can see many things about us—very often details that are less splashy than a bucket of ice water, but revealing in ways we'll never know.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Social Media Goes bananas over our World T20 Final Win

Just as India lost to Sri Lanka in the World Cricket T20 final, social media went berserk with well wishes for the national team on their great win. Here are some wishes that were captured from well-known cricketers from around the globe. 

Tweets by
Kumar Sangakkara / Mahela Jayawardene / Lahiru Thirimanne / AB de Villiers / Virat Kohli / Shahid Afridi / Rohit Sharma / Ravichandran Ashwin / Dinesh Chandimal / Shane Warne / Brendan Taylor / Umar Akmal / Mohammad Hafeez / Darren Sammy / Ravi Bopara / Chris Gayle / Kevin Pietersen / Tom Moody / Upul Tharanga / Adam Gilchrist / Farveez Maharoof

Mahela Jayawardene 


AB de Villiers

Kumar Sangakkara

Virat Kohli

Lahiru Thirimanne

Shahid Afridi

Rohit Sharma

Ravichandran Ashwin

Dinesh Chandimal

Shane Warne

Brendan Taylor

Umar Akmal 

Lahiru Thirimanne

Lahiru Thirimanne

Mahela Jayawardene

Mohammad Hafeez

Ravi Bopara

Darren Sammy

Chris Gayle

Kevin Pietersen

Tom Moody

Upul Tharanga

Adam Gilchrist

Michael Vaughan

Farveez Maharoof

Monday, December 9, 2013

Selfie tops Twerk as Oxford's word of the Year

Selfie
Selfie
Selfie' has been named the word of 2013 by Oxford Dictionaries, beating 'twerk', 'binge-watch' and 'showrooming' as the most popular new term of the year. Editors from Oxford Dictionaries said selfie has evolved from a niche social media tag into a mainstream term for a self-portrait photograph. It beat terms such as 'twerk' - made famous by Miley Cyrus and her appropriation of the move during a performance of Robin Thicke's Blurred Lines, 'binge-watch' referring to when somebody watches a number television episodes in one sitting and 'showrooming', where a product is examined at a shop before being bought cheaper online. A selfie is defined by Oxford Dictionaries as: "A photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website."
In alphabetical order, the shortlisted words for the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year 2013 are:

bedroom tax, noun, informal:
(in the UK) a reduction in the amount of housing benefit paid to a claimant if the property they are renting is judged to have more bedrooms than is necessary for the number of the people in the household, according to criteria set down by the government.

binge-watch, verb:
to watch multiple episodes of a television programme in rapid succession, typically by means of DVDs or digital streaming. [ORIGIN 1990s: from BINGE + WATCH, after BINGE-EAT, BINGE-DRINK.]

bitcoin, noun:
a digital currency in which transactions can be performed without the need for a central bank. Also, a unit of bitcoin. [ORIGIN early 21st century: from BIT, in the computing sense of ‘a unit of information’ and COIN.]

olinguito, noun:
a small furry mammal found in mountain forests in Colombia and Ecuador, the smallest member of the raccoon family. (Taxonomic name Bassaricyon neblina)  [ORIGIN 2013: diminutive form of OLINGO, a South American mammal resembling the kinkajou.]

schmeat, noun, informal:
a form of meat  produced synthetically from biological tissue. [ORIGIN early 21st century: perhaps from SYNTHETIC and MEAT, influenced by the use of ‘- -, schm - -’ as a disparaging or dismissive exclamation (e.g. fancy schmancy: ‘some of the gourmet sauces you get in fancy schmancy places are just too spicy for me’).]

showrooming, noun:
the practice of visiting a shop or shops in order to examine a product before buying it online at a lower price. [ORIGIN early 21st century: from SHOWROOM ‘a room used to display goods for sale’.]

twerk, verb:
dance to popular music in a sexually provocative manner involving thrusting hip movements and a low, squatting stance. [ORIGIN 1990s: probably an alteration of WORK.]

twerk
Twerk

One of the most popular selfies of this year was arguably the first one to feature a member of the Vatican, showing Pope Francis posing with teenagers in a selfie that quickly went viral. Mr Cameron also found himself embroiled in a selfie faux pas by his wife's sister on the morning of her wedding day, showing the Prime Minister asleep on a four poster bed.Oxford Dictionaries said the earliest known usage is an Australian online forum post from 2002: “Um, drunk at a mates 21st, I tripped over and landed lip first (with front teeth coming a very close second) on a set of steps. I had a hole about 1cm long right through my bottom lip. And sorry about the focus, it was a selfie.”

Judy Pearsall, editorial director for Oxford Dictionaries, said: “Using the Oxford Dictionaries language research programme, we can see a phenomenal upward trend in the use of selfie in 2013, and this helped to cement its selection as Word of the Year.”

She added: “Social media sites helped to popularize the term, with #selfie appearing on the photo-sharing website Flickr as early as 2004, but usage wasn't widespread until around 2012, when selfie was being used commonly in mainstream media sources.” “In early examples, the word was often spelled with a -y, but the -ie form is more common today and has become the accepted spelling. The use of the diminutive -ie suffix is notable, as it helps to turn an essentially narcissistic enterprise into something rather more endearing. Australian English has something of a penchant for -ie words – barbie for barbecue, firie for firefighter, tinnie for a can of beer – so this helps to support the evidence for selfie having originated in Australia.”

The frequency of the word selfie used in the English language has increased by 17,000 per cent since this time last year. This figure is calculated by Oxford Dictionaries using a research programme which collects around 150 million English words currently in use from around the web every month. Oxford Dictionaries has been awarding this title to words that attracted a lot of interest during a particular year since 2004. Previous words of the year include "omnishambles" (2012), "squeezed middle" (2011), "refudiate" (2010) and "unfriend" (2009).

Which words have been selected as Word of the Year in recent years?

Year
Oxford Dictionaries UK Word of the Year
Oxford Dictionaries US Word of the Year
2004
chav
2005
sudoku
podcast
2006
bovvered
carbon-neutral
2007
carbon footprint
locavore
2008
credit crunch
hypermiling
2009
simples
unfriend
2010
big society
refudiate
2011
squeezed middle
2012
omnishambles
GIF (verb)


Hashtag History

Hashtag History
Hashtag History
Hashtags are now used regularly by millions of social media users, especially among members of the largest micro-blogging community Twitter. Many are curious what the very first hashtag was and how it spread quickly across the internet. A hashtag is created by online users to discuss specific events and relevant issues. These are categorically arranged so that other online users can easily search for the topic and participate in the conversation, no matter where they are in the world. Information is updated and shared by social media users. Following in Twitter’s footsteps, Facebook incorporated the hashtag this year. And a March 2013 survey by RadiumOne found that more than half of mobile-device owners regularly use hashtags. So it’s hard to believe that at one time, hashtags weren’t a part of the Twitter lexicon. Not only that, but Twitter initially rejected the idea of hashtags.

The First Hashtag

Chris Messina, a social technology expert, is credited to have come up with the very first hashtag on Twitter.
He first posted the hashtag #barcamp in August 2007. The whole tweet appeared like this:

“how do you feel about using # (pound) for groups. As in #barcamp [msg]?”

Messina came up with the hashtag with the purpose of gathering discussions and online exchanges regarding Barcamp, a technology unconference gathering activity that spans worldwide. His handle is @MrMessina. Since then, hashtags have spread to other social media sites and all over the internet to become one of the most widely used functions. According to reports, Evan Williams, Twitter founder, actually shared to Messina that he didn’t think that hashtags were going to be very popular because of their very technical approach. Messina said that IRC influenced this pioneering concept. Hashtags were rather common in IRC before Twitter came into existence and dominated the way people communicated online. Messina posted “Whispering Tweets” on Twitter on August 25, 2007 with the idea of creating inner circles on the website. The goal was to provide users the proper restrictions that would limit conversations to more specific ones that would only relate to a particular audience. He shared how tweets should target certain members of the inner circle so that people can easily respond to these. Creating the inner circles would also lead to targeted users and avoid random visits from individuals who may not be truly interested in a particular issue or topic. In the blog post, Messina elaborated what he wanted these “channel tags” to do:

“What’s really interesting, however, i[s] how these channels can be used as tags within Twitter to open up entirely new possibilities.

Every time someone uses a channel tag to mark a status, not only do we know something specific about that status, but others can eavesdrop on the context of it and then join in the channel and contribute as well. Rather than trying to ping-pong discussion between one or more individuals with daisy-chained @replies, using a simple #reply means that people not in the @reply queue will be able to follow along, as people do with Flickr or Delicious tags. Furthermore, topics that enter into existing channels will become visible to those who have previously joined in the discussion.”

Hashtags Today

Today, hashtags are created by several social media experts, educators, institutions and major companies from all around the world to bring in more followers and increase brand recognition. You can check how well a hashtag is doing by exposing it to analytics tools that will tell you how many tweets are being made with it, how many impressions it is making online, who are talking about it, what other hashtags are being used and what people are saying exactly. These have shown to be one of the most useful features on Twitter and other social media platforms to bring in relevant audiences that will help spread information about related products and services. Hashtags or chats are regularly held to keep targeted audiences informed and for companies to get actual feedback.

The use of hashtags became mainstream after October 2007, when citizen journalists used them to give updates about a series of forest fires in San Diego. Messina said he sent a private message to one of the men covering the fire, Nate Ritter, asking him to use the hashtag #sandiegofire.

“That was one of the really great examples of citizen journalism aided by the use of the hashtag,” Messina said. In 2008, conservative politicians in the U.S. started using the hashtag #dontgo to keep Congress in session to vote on an energy bill. Now, Twitter has a whole guide on how to use hashtags. The company doesn’t mention Messina but says the hashtag “was created organically by Twitter users as a way to categorize messages.” Twitter wouldn’t formally comment on hashtags.

“Maybe 20 years from now hashtags will seem quaint, but they’re solving an important problem today,” Messina said, “allowing people to express more about the content they share in order to connect with more people.”

Hashtags are now used to chronicle events from Syria to the Emmys, to the SuperBowl to the government shutdown. When Kate Middleton went into the hospital to deliver the #royalbaby, the hashtag was used more than 900,000 times, according to Twitter.They have also spread to other social networks, like Google+ and Facebook, something Messina said he is happy to see.